Dot Net Development

Dot Net Development

.NET is both a business strategy from Microsoft and its collection of programming support for what are known as Web services, the ability to use the Web rather than your own computer for various services. Microsoft’s goal is to provide individual and business users with a seamlessly interoperable and Web-enabled interface for applications and computing devices and to make computing activities increasingly Web browser-oriented. The .NET platform includes servers; building block services, such as Web-based data storage; and device software. The .NET platform was designed to provide:

  • The ability to make the entire range of computing devices work together and to have user information automatically updated and synchronized on all of them.
  • Increased interactive capability for Web sites, enabled by greater use of XML (Extensible Markup Language) rather than HTML.
  • A premium online subscription service, that will feature customized access and delivery of products and services to the user from a central starting point for the management of various applications, such as e-mail, for example, or software, such as Office .NET.
  • The ability to integrate various communications media, such as e-mail, faxes, and telephones.
  • For developers, the ability to create reusable modules, which should increase productivity and reduce the number of programming errors.
ASP.Net

ASP.NET is a web application framework developed and marketed by Microsoft to allow programmers to build dynamic web sites, web applications and web services. It was first release in January 2002 with version 1.0 of the .NET Framework, and is the successor to Microsoft’s Active Server Pages (ASP) technology. ASP.NET is built on the Common Language Runtime (CLR), allowing programmers to write ASP.NET code using any supported .NET language. For Example:

<% @ Page Language="C#" CodeFile="SampleCodeBehind.aspx.cs" Inherits="Website.SampleCodeBehind" AutoEventWireup="true" %>

The above tag is placed at the beginning of the ASPX file. The CodeFile property of the @ Page directive specifies the file (.cs or .vb) acting as the code-behind while the Inherits property specifies the Class the Page derives from. In this example, the @ Page directive is included in SampleCodeBehind.aspx, and then SampleCodeBehind.aspx.cs acts as the code-behind for this page:

using System;
namespace Website
{
public partial class SampleCodeBehind : System.Web.UI.Page
{
protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
Response.Write(“Hello, world”);
}
}
}

In this case, the Page_Load() method is called every time the ASPX page is requested. The programmer can implement event handlers at several stages of the page execution process to perform processing.